Texts on the Semantic Web: Cracking Linearity

We live in a world where “every morning demands an excruciating choice of which exciting link to follow first. [see. Sir Tim Berners-Lee Blogging is Great, thanks to the amazing Internet Archive]

In a Linked Data state of mind, that is a good news.

We are in for quite a journey towards cracking the linearity of our thoughts, texts and tales (narratives).

What the electronic connected word (turned into the right linked data) does really well these days, compared to its predecessor – the print written word, is avoid the tyranny of categorisation and prioritisation of one thing over another.

On the Semantic Web, any thing, thought and tale is primus inter pares, ready to enter an assemblage automagically, whenever the context might have it to.

On the Semantic Web, any thing, thought and tale is primus inter pares, ready to enter an assemblage automagically, whenever the context might have it to. Click To Tweet

All this is to say that Linked Data (through the representation of content and the meaningful connections it can create and render) expands the rhetorical possibilities – the ability to impact, convince, delight, of the text and the data flowing beneath it. [If you feel like delving deeper into this connection, I have written about how Aristotle’s ethos, pathos, logo meets the 4 characteristics of data to help content writing thrive in a Web of Trust in: The Rhetorical Triangle and the 4 Vs of Data]

On the Semantic Web, texts become even more powerful a rhetorical tool (means of persuasion), dancing with what data has to offer to web writers and readers in terms of practices, processes and perspectives.

Digitised and connected, texts make writing shine brighter and impress what it needs to on the reader with greater rhetorical impact.

And this is one of the ways writing transforms and enters a brave new, interconnected world.

Let me end this musing with a quote, for which I thank a beautiful mind Eva Dimitrova for pointing me to it:

Writing reveals and even relies upon analogies, metaphors, and unexpected similarities: there is resonance between a story in the news and a medieval European folktale, say, or between a photo taken in a war-wrecked city and an 18th-century landscape painting. These sorts of relations might remain dormant or unnoticed until writing brings them to the foreground: previously unconnected topics and themes begin to interact, developing meanings not present in those original subjects on their own.

Cit.  The Ghost of Cognition Past, or Thinking Like An Algorithm

Thanks for reading. Stay linked and brave!

The Brave New Text is now published. Look inside it on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HQ5TYQ5 !

Texts on the Semantic Web: Cracking Linearity

by Teodora Petkova time to read: 2 min
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